The tragic culmination of their encounter is not disputed: Mr. Stone drew his gun and shot Mr. Bird, leaving him paralyzed from the neck down. Mr. Bird’s insurance company declined to cover his medical bills. The reason? His injuries resulted from “illegal activity.” Yet Mr. Bird was not convicted of any crime in connection with the incident. He was not even charged.

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The face of a killer constructed from DNA left at the scene of a crime: it sounds like science fiction. But revealing the face of a criminal based on their genes may be closer than we think

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A Colorado judge on why we don’t know nearly enough about the link between the young brains and behavior

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There were subscriptions to dating websites, meals at Hooters and purchases at Victoria’s Secret — not to mention jet ski joy rides and couples’ cruises to the Caribbean. All of it was paid for with the nearly $200 million donated to cancer charities, and was enjoyed by the healthy friends and family members of those running the groups

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Bioethicist Art Caplan said Stokes’s case was a difficult one to begin with, but Tuesday’s events don’t change anything. “The bottom line is I don’t really think today’s sad events mean two years ago we shouldn’t have given him a chance,” Caplan said. “We didn’t know what would happen to him.”

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The largest pharmacist association in the country has voted to discourage its members from participating in executions. The move could make executions harder for states that have been ordering their drugs from compounding pharmacies

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I. Glenn Cohen: The relationship between medicine and capital punishment has been a persistent feature of this past year in health law, both at the level of medical ethics and Supreme Court review

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A new study finds that involuntary psychiatric treatment programs can keep people from cycling through ERs, jails, prisons, and homeless shelters—and therefore save taxpayers gobs of money. Is it worth it?

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