A Turbulent Mind

September 4, 2018

Andrew Goldstein’s crime set in motion a dramatic shift in how we care for the violent mentally ill. Including for himself—when he’s released this month

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A Dangerous Brain

August 15, 2018

Can neuroscience predict how likely someone is to commit another crime?

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The Eldred case is philosophically tricky, said Eric E. Sterling, executive director of the Criminal Justice Policy Foundation. “We’re punishing someone who has a disease. Yet we don’t want to create an exemption from punishment for people who commit crimes when they are addicts.”

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Heirs of Prince have sued an Illinois hospital and pharmacy chain Walgreens, saying they could have prevented the singer’s 2016 death if they had properly diagnosed and treated his overdose days earlier, a court document showed on Monday

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After a Marine attacked an Iraqi restaurant in Portland, Ore., his family said he was provoked by trauma, not hate, and that he needed help, not jail time

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The brain damage was so severe that scientists all but gasped. Aaron Hernandez, the former New England Patriots tight end who was convicted of murder, killed himself in prison in April at age 27. An autopsy revealed that he had brain injuries akin to those seen in afflicted former players in their 60s, researchers announced on Thursday

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Aaron Hernandez, the former New England Patriots tight end and a convicted murderer, was 27 when he committed suicide in April. Yet a posthumous examination of his brain showed he had such a severe form of the degenerative brain disease C.T.E. that the damage was akin to that of players well into their 60s

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