In any outbreak or public health crisis, health organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention need to deliver accurate and timely information to the public about risks and treatments. For most people, this information comes mainly from the news media

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Watch now – our Travis Rieder joins host Greta Van Susteren to discuss challenges related to opioid use and withdrawal.

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In the first issue of the Humanitarian Health Digest, Paul Spiegel stresses the need to highlight the lack of palliative care in humanitarian emergencies. Both refugees and nationals with life-limiting illnesses need more dignified, cost-effective care, he argues

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Jon McHann, 56, got started on prescription opioids the way a lot of adults in the U.S. did: he was in pain following an accident. In his case, it was a fall. “I hit my tailbone just right, and created a severe bulging disc” that required surgery, McHann says. McHann, who lives in Smithville, Tenn., expected to make a full recovery and go back to work as a heavy haul truck driver. But 10 years after his accident, he’s still at home

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It’s worth noting that Medicaid expansion helps pay for opioid addiction treatment, said Brendan Saloner of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Medicaid expansion covers costs treatments like detoxification, outpatient treatment, and treatment for masked health conditions

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Our Jess Fanzo is among the guests on the Better Business Show Podcast, reporting on the global food crisis at the Planting Seeds for the Future of Food conference in Vevey, Switzerland

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Williamson has some of West Virginia’s highest rates of obesity, disability, and arthritis — in a state that already ranks among the worst in those categories. An adult in Williamson has twice the chance of dying from an injury as the average American. This is why the opioid crisis is so hard to handle, here and in so many communities: The underlying drugs are often being prescribed for real reasons

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All it took was one paragraph. In 1980, a pair of doctors published a brief letter in the New England Journal of Medicine. Spanning a total of five sentences, the letter claimed, with little substantial evidence, that the development of addiction was very rare in hospitalized patients who briefly received opioids and had no prior history of addiction

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