The new tools will likely open the doors for scientists to explore many novel areas. With comments from our Alan Regenberg

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Kevin Esvelt of MIT writes, “The epidemic of Lyme disease is an ecological problem of our own making: We have inadvertently altered our environment to maximize the number of infected ticks. The question today is whether we should consider altering the genomes of wild animals to undo that mistake.”

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Should we get rid of them? The pesky insect is the deadliest animal in human history

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CRISPR’s reputation was tarnished last year after a researcher in China edited a gene in embryos that went on to develop into two baby girls. The current CRISPR trials don’t have the same ethical challenges — the therapies won’t lead to DNA changes that can be inherited, says Alan Regenberg, Still, he says, there’s reason for caution when working with humans

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The technology that produced a global scandal in China last year has entered into clinical trials to treat sickle cell anemia and an eye disease

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On 10 June 2017, a sunny and hot Saturday in Shenzhen, China, two couples came to the Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) to discuss whether they would participate in a medical experiment that no researcher had ever dared to conduct

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China now has at least four groups of CRISPR researchers doing gene editing with large colonies of monkeys

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Victoria Gray is waiting patiently in a hospital room at the Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville

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