CRISPR’s reputation was tarnished last year after a researcher in China edited a gene in embryos that went on to develop into two baby girls. The current CRISPR trials don’t have the same ethical challenges — the therapies won’t lead to DNA changes that can be inherited, says Alan Regenberg, Still, he says, there’s reason for caution when working with humans

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The technology that produced a global scandal in China last year has entered into clinical trials to treat sickle cell anemia and an eye disease

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On 10 June 2017, a sunny and hot Saturday in Shenzhen, China, two couples came to the Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) to discuss whether they would participate in a medical experiment that no researcher had ever dared to conduct

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China now has at least four groups of CRISPR researchers doing gene editing with large colonies of monkeys

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Victoria Gray is waiting patiently in a hospital room at the Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville

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CRISPR Conundrum

July 23, 2019

Strict European court ruling leaves food-testing labs without a plan. Scientists struggle to detect the unauthorized sale of gene-edited crops whose altered DNA can mimic natural mutations

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A bipartisan trio of senators on Monday introduced a resolution underscoring their opposition to the experiments last year in China that led to the birth of the world’s first genome-edited babies

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Host Bethany Brookshire leads a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg.

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