If a peer-reviewed paper bears out the news story, “It’s one more step on the path to potential clinical application,” says bioethicist Jeffrey Kahn of Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, who served on a committee convened by the NASEM to address gene editing. The panel’s report earlier this year concluded that a clinical trial involving embryo editing would be ethically allowable under narrow circumstances.

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There’s less going on here than meets the eye

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Researchers have demonstrated they can efficiently improve the DNA of human embryos

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I went to a New York classroom to see how kids were being prepared for the future of gene editing.

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If there was one misstep that doomed the long and bitter fight by the University of California to wrest key CRISPR patents from the Broad Institute, it was star UC Berkeley scientist Jennifer Doudna’s habit of being scientifically cautious, realistic, and averse to overpromising.

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The gene editing tool CRISPR could one day mean that we can simply edit away disease, blight and undesirable genetic traits. Now, it’s also gaining traction in another realm of medical technology: diagnosing disease

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Australian scientists are pushing for a relaxation of the laws surrounding gene editing technology to allow experiments to be performed on human embryos

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The key to eliminating Zika? Since 2015, the U.S. and U.S. territories have reported 5,074 and 38,306 cases of Zika, respectively. The Zika virus is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes aegypti mosquito

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