Scientists at University of Edinburgh’s Roslin Institute have genetically engineered pigs to be resistant to the virus that causes Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome. A disaster once dubbed the “mystery swine disease”.

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Last week, the US Patent and Trademarks office handed down a decision in one of the most high-profile patent cases of the century. In a one sentence ruling, an appeals board granted the rights to the powerful gene editing technology CRISPR-Cas9 to the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, while leaving the door open for rival CRISPR pioneer UC Berkeley to file a new patent to lay claim to those same discoveries

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Gene-Editing Gets A Go-Ahead

February 22, 2017

Those in the know call CRISPR “one of the greatest life science inventions ever.” It has revolutionized the ability to make precise changes to human DNA, opening the door to revolutionary ways to treat disease – but also to ethical questions about engineered designer babies. This hour On Point, the brave new world of human DNA editing and CRISPR. Guests include our Jeffrey Kahn

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Three judges have released their decision

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Expert group recommends long-term tracking, other restrictions for germline tinkering. Jeffrey Kahn, a bioethicist at Johns Hopkins University, says the door to heritable gene therapy remains closed until stringent requirements can be met. “It’s frankly more of a knock on the door,” he said at the public presentation of the report

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Human Genome Editing

February 15, 2017

Science, Ethics, and Governance. The National Academies has published a consensus study by a multidisciplinary team of experts, including our Jeffrey Kahn,

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A one-off injection could one day lower your cholesterol levels for the rest of your life. People born with natural mutations that disable a specific gene have a lower risk of heart disease, with no apparent side effects. Now a single injection has successfully disabled this same gene in animal tests for the first time

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David Ishee’s plan was simple, if not exactly free of complication. From the shed that functions as his laboratory in rural Mississippi, he hoped to use genetic engineering to rid dogs of the types of terrible disorders caused by decades of high-end breeding. Ishee is a biohacker, one among a growing number of do-it-yourself scientists that the federal government is having an increasingly difficult time figuring out what to do with

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