CRISPR Conundrum

July 23, 2019

Strict European court ruling leaves food-testing labs without a plan. Scientists struggle to detect the unauthorized sale of gene-edited crops whose altered DNA can mimic natural mutations

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A bipartisan trio of senators on Monday introduced a resolution underscoring their opposition to the experiments last year in China that led to the birth of the world’s first genome-edited babies

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Host Bethany Brookshire leads a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg.

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The proposal follows a Chinese scientist who claimed to have created twins from edited embryos last year. Molecular biologist Denis Rebrikov has told Nature he is considering implanting gene-edited embryos into women, possibly before the end of the year if he can get approval by then

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A fertility clinic in Dubai emailed He Jiankui on December 5 — just a week after he announced the births — asking if he could teach its clinicians “CRISPR gene editing for Embryology Lab Application.”

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An international commission, including our Jeffrey Kahn, has been convened by the NAM, NAS, and the Royal Society with the participation of science & medical academies around the world, to develop a framework for scientists, clinicians, and regulatory authorities to consider when assessing potential clinical applications of human germline genome editing

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The draft rules mean that anyone who manipulates human genes in adults or embryos is responsible for adverse outcomes

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A panel of government-appointed experts in Germany agreed unanimously that the human germline “is not inviolable,” rejecting one objection to using genome editing technologies such as CRISPR to make heritable changes in the DNA of human embryos, sperm, or eggs

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