Powerful and possibly unregulated, gene editing starts new boom in GMOs

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Kathy Niakan’s application to use a new gene-editing technique on embryos is controversial because we lack a clear moral framework for such science

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It is “essential” that the genetic modification of human embryos is allowed, says a group of scientists, ethicists and policy experts. A Hinxton Group report says editing the genetic code of early stage embryos is of “tremendous value” to research

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The director of the Progress Educational Trust says that only continued research will tell us what we can – or cannot – do with this powerful new technology

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Members of the Hinxton Group are meeting in Manchester, England, to discuss the ethical use and regulation of genetic modification technologies.

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What is the essence of being a human? Is it our thoughts, our emotions? Are we defined by what we do, our achievements; our great successes and failures? Or are we merely the result of the interactions of some 25,000 genes?

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Amateurs are ready and able to try the CRISPR technique for rewriting genes

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Editas Medicine, based in Cambridge, Mass., already had money. Founded in Nov 2013 with $43 million, it was the first big CRISPR effort out of the gate. But those investments are dwarfed by today’s announcement, which will put $120 million into the tiny company’s bank account – enough, Editas says, to keep it running for a projected three years

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