A new study published this week in the journal Nature Genetics tackles one CRISPR complication. CRISPR gene-editing systems can easily cut many pieces of DNA at once, but actually editing all those genes is a lot more time-consuming

Quick Read

Couples will soon choose their future kids from 100 clinic-created embryos, writes Henry Greely

Quick Read

Monica Coenraads’ daughter has never spoken since she blurted out “duck!” while taking a bath soon before her first birthday, and has never walked

Quick Read

The Childx conference, a TED-style event happening next week at Stanford, will feature a keynote session by bioethicist Jeffrey Kahn, PhD, director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. Kahn’s longstanding interest in ethical issues around emerging biomedical technologies puts him firmly at the intersection between pediatric medical science and public policy — the theme of this year’s conference

Quick Read

But signing up black patients for clinical trials will be a hard sell. The first attempts to use a groundbreaking gene-editing technology in people will likely target patients with sickle cell disease, a crippling inherited disorder that in the U.S. predominantly strikes African-Americans

Quick Read

Many advocate an international consensus on ethical issues around a science that makes fundamental changes to human DNA yet still isn’t completely understood. “How do we make sure everyone is under the same tent?” says Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Berman Institute of Bioethics at Johns Hopkins University. With Crispr science still uncertain, “we need to be talking to each other internationally.”

Quick Read

Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Berman Institute of Bioethics, joined host Kerri Miller to discuss innovations in gene editing and the consequences that must be considered

Quick Read

In September, the U.S. Department of Agriculture gave the green light to a version of the plant Camelina sativa, an important oilseed crop that had been genetically engineered using CRISPR to produce enhanced omega-3 oil. What was interesting about this approval was that the USDA did not ask that the inventors of the plant endure the usual regulatory hoops required to sell biotech crops

Quick Read