Science and Society

May 6, 2015

Plans to begin construction of a $1.4b giant telescope on Mauna Kea, a dormant volcano on the island of Hawaii, have been put on hold in the face of continuing protests

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Q&A with Elizabeth Dzeng, MD, MPH, MPhil, MS, lead author of a new study exploring the influence of institutional culture & policies on do-not-resuscitate decision making at the end of life

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To hear Oliver Sacks tell it, writing books for a mass audience was once considered one of the worst things a doctor could do

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Wynne Lee’s mind was at war with itself – one voice telling her to kill herself and another telling her to live. She had just turned 14

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Finda Fallah sat in her tiny one-bedroom apartment, boiling up rice and leftovers with one of the few children in her family still alive. It was the night before Decoration Day, one of the nation’s most important public holidays, when Liberians clean, paint and decorate the graves of their relatives to honor lost loved ones

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Common in the US, rare in Europe and now championed in Africa, male circumcision is hotly debated. Jessica Wapner explores whether the gains are worth the loss

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So why aren’t black celebrities, pastors and the NAACP screaming about this issue? Because, according to Dr. Carlton Haywood Jr. of the Berman Institute of Bioethics, a lot of this anti-vaccination movement is about class and choice, as much as it’s about race. “It’s true that blacks and Latinos are less likely to get immunized from diseases than whites, but a lot of that is about healthcare access”

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People in Cambodia experience what we Americans call depression. But there’s no direct translation for the word “depression” in the Cambodian Khmer language. Instead, people may say thelea tdeuk ceut, which literally means “the water in my heart has fallen.”

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