For example, data about a mobile phone’s past location and movement patterns can be used to predict where a person lives, who their employer is, where they attend religious services and the age range of their children based on where they drop them off for school

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The president of FamilyTreeDNA, one of the country’s largest at-home genetic testing companies, has apologized to its users for failing to disclose that it was sharing DNA data with federal investigators working to solve violent crimes

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In managing vast databases of genetic information, the NIH has something to learn from Facebook

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Adrien Locatelli, a French teenager claims to have injected DNA strands encoding verses from the Bible and the Quran in his thighs

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Tech giants like Amazon and Apple are expanding their businesses to include electronic health records — which contain data on diagnoses, prescriptions and other medical information. That’s creating both opportunities and spurring privacy concerns. Here’s what to know (Video)

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Scientists and universities receiving funds from the National Institutes of Health for cutting-edge research need to tighten their security procedures and take other precautions, said a panel of experts commissioned by the agency to investigate “foreign influences on research integrity.”

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This year, an estimated 6 million workers worldwide will receive wearable fitness trackers as part of workplace wellness programs. That’s up from about 2 million in 2016, according to ABI Research, a market research firm

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For Dr. Piero Anversa, the fall from scientific grace has been long, and the landing hard

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