Fourteen years ago, a leading drug maker published a study showing that the antidepressant Paxil was safe and effective for teenagers. On Wednesday, a major medical journal posted a new analysis of the same data concluding that the opposite is true

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On a slippery slope? Barron Lerner & Arthur Caplan: The slippery slope is an argument frequently invoked in the world of bioethics. It connotes the notion that a particular course of action will lead inevitably to undesirable and unintended consequences. Saying no to the original action, even if that act is moral in itself, may, in light of the slope that looms, be the ethical thing to do.

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The company that began as a source of genealogical data now hopes to marry that information with DNA data—and sell it for research

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To realize the full potential of large data sets, researchers must agree on better ways to pass data around, says Martin Bobrow

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Health care and its availability are important drivers of public health, but everyone knows behavior is a big deal, too. Over the past 50 years, Americans have quit smoking, started driving safer cars, put on weight, and bought more guns

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When Bruce Hodgins went to the doctor for a checkup in Sioux City, Iowa, he was asked to complete a lengthy survey to gauge his health risks. In return for filling it out, he saved a $10 monthly premium for his Medicaid coverage

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A new California company announced Monday it is offering a much cheaper and easier way for women to get tested for genetic mutations that increase their risk for breast and ovarian cancer

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23andMe, the Google-backed personal genetics startup, will no longer just sell tests to consumers, or genetic data to pharmaceutical companies. This morning, it announced that it plans to start inventing medicines itself

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