Why you aren’t as anonymous as you think online. So-called ‘anonymous’ data can be easily used to identify everything from our medical records to purchase histories

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There is a general shortage of information about the safety of medications used during pregnancy—largely because any woman who is pregnant, was recently pregnant, or might get pregnant is barred from participating in most of the clinical trials that evaluate drug safety and efficacy

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Following the Cambridge Analytica scandal, it was reported that Facebook planned to partner with medical organizations to obtain health records on thousands of users. The plans were put on hold when news of the scandal broke

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Facebook has halted plans to collect patient data from hospitals and match it up with its users’ information. The social network confirmed the idea had been discussed but had been “paused” while the company dealt with its privacy crisis

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Researchers conducted a “recycling audit” of five hospitals in Toronto between November 2014 and May 2016 and found that frequently hospitals improperly threw out sensitive patient information

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This spring, the National Institutes of Health will start recruiting participants for one of the most ambitious medical projects ever envisioned. The goal is to find one million people in the United States, from all walks of life and all racial and ethnic groups, who are willing to have their genomes sequenced, and to provide their medical records and regular blood samples

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“Let me do some research, and I’ll get back to you,” my patient said

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Holly Fernandez Lynch writes, “Nevertheless, even the upswing still leaves quite a bit of the glass empty: Results from more than 1 in 4 trials have still not been properly reported. The ethical consequences are substantial, and the government should be using its considerable enforcement authority to put an end to it. But it isn’t.”

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