This spring, the National Institutes of Health will start recruiting participants for one of the most ambitious medical projects ever envisioned. The goal is to find one million people in the United States, from all walks of life and all racial and ethnic groups, who are willing to have their genomes sequenced, and to provide their medical records and regular blood samples

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“Let me do some research, and I’ll get back to you,” my patient said

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Holly Fernandez Lynch writes, “Nevertheless, even the upswing still leaves quite a bit of the glass empty: Results from more than 1 in 4 trials have still not been properly reported. The ethical consequences are substantial, and the government should be using its considerable enforcement authority to put an end to it. But it isn’t.”

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The National Institutes of Health has launched PregSource, a research project that aims to improve knowledge of pregnancy by collecting information directly from pregnant women. The project will explore physical and emotional aspects of pregnancy, labor and delivery and will identify distinct challenges faced by subgroups of women

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Drug overdose deaths, once rare, are now the leading cause of accidental death in the U.S., surpassing peak annual deaths caused by motor vehicle accidents, guns and HIV infection

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The US is sitting on one of the largest data sets on any animal group, but most of it is inaccessible and restricted to local agencies

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If you watched the drama in Washington last month, you may have come away with the impression that the American health care system is a hopeless mess. So it is surprising that across the continent from Washington, investors and technology entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley see the American health care system as the next great market for reform

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The widely accepted principle that mums-to-be are a ‘vulnerable’ group unfairly excludes them from taking part in clinical studies, and perpetuates the knowledge void around the impact of drugs taken during pregnancy, conclude researchers in the Journal of Medical Ethics. In a linked Commentary, Drs Carleigh Krubiner and Ruth Faden, of the Berman Institute, argue that the designation of pregnant women as ‘vulnerable’ “is inappropriate and disrespectful.”

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