The University of Tokyo today announced it is launching an investigation into anonymously made claims of fabricated and falsified data appearing in 22 papers by six university research groups. An individual or group going by the name “Ordinary_researchers” detailed questions about data and graphs in more than 100 pages delivered to the university in two batches on 14 and 29 August

Quick Read

Alleged theft from Italian gene bank dismissed — but ownership of samples remains under investigation

Quick Read

Long-awaited plan would exempt computer-aided harvesting from EU copyright law

Quick Read

President Obama has promised to support a bold future for medicine where diagnostic testing and treatments aren’t just what’s best for most people – they’re what’s best for you. This “precision medicine” takes individual variations in our genes and environments into account. Getting there will require genetic and health data from as many people as possible to uncover relationships

Quick Read

Euny Hong: I did a 23andMe genetic test because I suspected I might be partially descended from Middle-Eastern medieval merchants, who were Korea’s first Occidental trading partners. (My feeble basis for this theory included my hair texture and a possible epigenetic explanation for my Jewish conversion.) But the data took me in some strange directions. As did the horrifying lack of data

Quick Read

When I started out as a doctor in 1999, the IOM published a blockbuster report that declared that up to 98,000 people were dying in US hospitals each year as a result of preventable medical errors. Just a few months ago, a study in the BMJ declared that number has now risen to more than 250,000, making preventable medical errors in hospitals the third-largest cause of death in the country in 2013

Quick Read

Researcher who spent months chasing permission to republish online data sets urges others to read up on the law

Quick Read

Before a drug can be marketed, it has to go through rigorous testing to show it is safe and effective. Surgery, though, is different. The Food and Drug Administration does not regulate surgical procedures. So what happens when an operation is subjected to and fails the ultimate test — a clinical trial in which patients are randomly assigned to have it or not?

Quick Read