Deep Brain Stimulation

August 14, 2019

DBS is an incredibly promising intervention for intractable neurological and psychiatric illness. What are the risks?

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David Dobbs writes, “An early halt to a trial of deep brain stimulation for depression reveals little about the treatment but more about the changing nature of clinical trials.”

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Mr. B loves Johnny Cash, except when he doesn’t. Mr. X has watched his doctors morph into Italian chefs right before his eyes. The link between the two? Both Mr. B and Mr. X received deep brain stimulation

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Christian Lüscher considers an alarming career from the early days of psychiatry

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Patients who lose consciousness for more than a year are considered extremely unlikely to regain it, but a 35-year-old Frenchman who had been in a vegetative state for 15 years has shown hints of awareness after having key brain regions electrically stimulated, scientists reported on Monday

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—Or a Total Disaster. Why is the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency developing a controversial, cutting-edge brain chip technology that could one day treat everything from major depressive disorder to hand cramps?

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Last year, in an operating room at the University of Toronto, a 63-year-old woman with Alzheimer’s disease experienced something she hadn’t for 55 years: a memory of her 8-year-old self playing with her siblings on their family farm in Scotland

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At February’s Neuroethics and Neuroscience in the News journal club, Dr. Helen Mayberg spoke passionately about the approach that led her team to attempt DBS for major depressive disorder (MDD), the ensuing media response, and how that has affected her ongoing work to improve the technique, better understand the etiology of MDD, and allow patients to get back to their lives

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