Why African-Americans don’t use hospice. Even as end-of-life planning gains favor with more Americans, African-Americans, research shows, remain very skeptical of options like hospice and advance directives

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Most of us would rather not think about what happens to our bodies after death. But that breakdown gives birth to new life in unexpected ways, writes Moheb Costandi

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If all goes as hoped, the body will turn into compost. It is a startling next step in the natural burial movement. Even as more people opt for interment in simple shrouds or biodegradable caskets, urban cemeteries continue to fill up. For the environmentally conscious, cremation is a problematic option, as the process releases greenhouse gases

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How We Die

March 30, 2015

Recent stories on death and dying offer interesting perspectives on discussing, preparing for and coping with an inevitable part of all of our lives

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Physician incentives are needed to improve end of life care in the U.S., health experts said Friday at an Institute of Medicine (IOM) forum

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“Death is nothing at all,” the English theologian Henry Scott Holland wrote a century ago in a reflection that is often quoted at funerals. Death is but life extended, Holland said: “I have only slipped away to the next room. Nothing has happened. Everything remains exactly as it was.”

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There is a looming problem in many parts of the world over what to do with dead bodies, as pressure on burial space intensifies

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The advocacy group Compassion & Choices says that bills on aid-in-dying have been introduced this year in Alaska, California, Colorado, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Wyoming and Utah. Court cases have surfaced in New York and California

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