When we visit our doctor or go into hospital, we have faith in the knowledge that the healthcare professionals involved are treating us according to proven scientific methods, otherwise known as evidence-based medicine (EBM). This means they’re prescribing drugs or selecting treatment methods that have proven successful in clinical research

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A runaway trolley is approaching a fork in the tracks. If the trolley is allowed to run on its current track, a work crew of five will be killed. If the driver steers the train down the other branch, a lone worker will be killed. If you were driving this trolley what would you do? What would a computer or robot driving this trolley do? Autonomous systems are coming whether people like it or not. Will they be ethical?

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OMG – What R They Thinking?

November 20, 2015

Video from our Bioethics Seminar Series: Douglas Diekema presents on adolescent brain development and the implications for decision making

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Anne and Omar Shamiyeh first learned something was wrong with one of their twins during their 18-week ultrasound

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Q&A with Elizabeth Dzeng, MD, MPH, MPhil, MS, lead author of a new study exploring the influence of institutional culture & policies on do-not-resuscitate decision making at the end of life

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Armies of the finest minds in computer science have dedicated themselves to improving the odds of making a sale. The Internet-era abundance of data and clever software has opened the door to tailored marketing, targeted advertising and personalized product recommendations

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In many hospitals and clinics around the country, oncologists and surgeons simply tell cancer patients what treatments they should have, or at least give them strong recommendations. But here, under a formal process called “shared decision making,” doctors and patients are working together to make choices about care

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When a doctor tells a patient that she has cancer and has just a year left to live, that patient often hears very little afterward. It’s as though the physician said “cancer” and then “blah, blah, blah.”

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