Public health experts are debating how to help the 1 million children in the Philippines who received a new vaccine against dengue that could, in rare cases, sicken rather than protect them

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They are our apex predator, the deadliest hunters of human beings on the planet

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At least 28,000 people affected of which 54, mostly children, have died in the worst dengue outbreak in decades

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While there are several common challenges that help explain why vaccination rates in the Philippines aren’t up to where public health officials say they need to be, there’s another reason behind the outbreak. The country suffered a major vaccine scandal two years ago that has left many Filipinos distrustful, even fearful of vaccines

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The agency ruled that Dengvaxia, can only be used in individuals aged 9 to 16 living in parts of the United States where the dengue virus is endemic. Furthermore, the vaccine can only be given to children and teens who have had one previous laboratory-confirmed case of dengue

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A prominent pediatrician and medical researcher in the Philippines has been indicted over the failed—and many say premature—introduction of Dengvaxia, a vaccine against dengue that was yanked from the Philippine market in 2017 because of safety issues

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Sanofi limited access to vaccine after deaths of children were reported in the Philippines

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The Food and Drug Administration has agreed to consider Sanofi Pasteur’s application for Dengvaxia, the world’s first licensed vaccine that protects against dengue but one that brings with it considerable controversy and concern

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