It was 70 years ago that the poet W.H. Auden published “The Age of Anxiety,” a six-part verse framing modern humankind’s condition over the course of more than 100 pages, and now it seems we are too rattled to even sit down and read something that long (or as the internet would say, tl;dr)

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Research suggests some are seeking out painkillers when what they really need is Prozac

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Ketamine can ease depression in hours, but researchers might have misjudged how it works

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By detecting trends that humans are unable to spot, researchers hope to treat the disorder more effectively. Depression is a simple-sounding condition with complex origins that aren’t fully understood. Now, machine learning may enable scientists to unpick some of its mysteries in order to provide better treatment

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A Dangerous Wait

February 6, 2017

Colleges can’t meet soaring student needs for mental health care. STAT surveyed dozens of universities about their mental health services. From major public institutions to small elite colleges, a striking pattern emerged: Students often have to wait weeks just for an initial intake exam to review their symptoms. The wait to see a psychiatrist who can prescribe or adjust medication — often a part-time employee — may be longer still

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A history of controversy, but also of help. The public grief over Carrie Fisher’s death was not only for an actress who played one of the most iconic roles in film history. It was also for one who spoke with wit and courage about her struggle with mental illness. Fisher’s bravery, though, was not just in fighting the stigma of her illness, but also in declaring in her memoir “Shockaholic” her voluntary use of a stigmatized treatment: ECT

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For researchers who study the genetics of MDD, it’s become a numbers game: To reach statistical power, they need larger cohorts.

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What do they say about our health system? A recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association concludes that 27 percent of medical students around the world exhibit symptoms of depression and 11 percent have thought of taking their own lives. Equally troubling is the fact that, among students experiencing depressive symptoms, only 16 percent seek psychiatric treatment

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