For some, progress cannot come soon enough. Running short on time, dying cancer patients are concocting do-it-yourself versions of highly experimental cancer therapies, without the oversight of doctors or regulators

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Stacey Lee, an assistant professor at JHU’s Carey Business School, suggests a more transparent process for patients

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…Instead of pursuing the traditional routes for treatment—surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy—she spent two weeks at a private clinic in Tijuana, which offered a variety of treatments rarely administered in the United States: a compound known as cesium carbonate, infusions of vitamin C, a variety of immune boosters, and the drug Laetrile, sometimes referred to as vitamin B-17, which was declared illegal by the FDA

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Scientists on Monday will urge the Food and Drug Administration to crack down on rogue clinics across the country that market stem cell treatments for a dizzying array of ailments from autism to paralysis to erectile dysfunction

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Linnea Olson, an artist and shop owner in Lowell, Mass., knew the experimental drug she was given might save her life. She also knew it might kill her

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