Flinching as a gunshot whizzes past your window. Covering your ears when a police car races down your street, sirens blaring. Walking past a drug deal on your block or a beating at your school. For kids living in picket-fence suburbia, these experiences might be rare. But for their peers in urban poverty, they are all too commonplace

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The infection, an emerging threat, has killed virtually all of its victims so far in India

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When images emerged last year of fetal lambs growing inside “Biobags” — giant, translucent, polyethylene sacks filled with synthetic amniotic fluid — Anna Smajdor’s visceral and immediate reaction was horror

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Advocates are tracking new developments in neonatal research and technology—and transforming one of America’s most contentious debates. With comments from our Debra Mathews

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The promise of personalized medicine is a pretty big one: Tailoring treatments to a patient’s genes, their environment or their lifestyle, the thinking goes, will result in treatments that are much more likely to work. The same disease can manifest differently in different people, so why treat patients with a one-size-fits-all-approach?

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Although vaccines typically take years to produce, test, and license, US health officials had voiced confidence that Zika would not be a difficult target, and some predicted that a vaccine could be made and fully tested, ready for FDA assessment, within two to three years. Others predicted a licensed Zika vaccine could be available sometime in 2020

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That’s dangerous. When the results of clinical trials aren’t made public, the consequences can be dangerous — and potentially deadly

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An unprecedented study in Bangladesh could reveal how malnutrition, poor sanitation and other challenges make their mark on child development

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