The promise of personalized medicine is a pretty big one: Tailoring treatments to a patient’s genes, their environment or their lifestyle, the thinking goes, will result in treatments that are much more likely to work. The same disease can manifest differently in different people, so why treat patients with a one-size-fits-all-approach?

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Although vaccines typically take years to produce, test, and license, US health officials had voiced confidence that Zika would not be a difficult target, and some predicted that a vaccine could be made and fully tested, ready for FDA assessment, within two to three years. Others predicted a licensed Zika vaccine could be available sometime in 2020

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That’s dangerous. When the results of clinical trials aren’t made public, the consequences can be dangerous — and potentially deadly

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An unprecedented study in Bangladesh could reveal how malnutrition, poor sanitation and other challenges make their mark on child development

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Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz at the University of Cambridge and her team made the embryos using embryonic stem cells, the type of cells found in embryos that can mature into any type of tissue in the body

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Marlene McCarthy’s breast cancer has grown relentlessly over the past seven years, spreading painfully through her bones and making it impossible to walk without a cane. Although the 73-year-old knows there’s no cure for her disease, she wants researchers to do better

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Not so fast, says one key UK expert. “It’s too soon,” said philosopher Mary Warnock, who chaired a committee in the 1980s that informed current regulations. “What we should do now is give people who do research the chance to exploit what they can find out between 5 and 14 days.”

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The Race for a Zika Vaccine

November 21, 2016

The Zika virus thrives in tropical climates. But it is also growing in this cold-weather city — up a flight of stairs, past a flier for lunchtime yoga and behind a locked door. That is where scientists working in a lab for Takeda, the Japanese drug company, inspect and test vials of the virus

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