The Privacy Project

April 15, 2019

Boundaries of privacy are in dispute, and its future is in doubt. Citizens, politicians and business leaders are asking if societies are making the wisest tradeoffs. The Times is embarking on this project to explore the technology and where it’s taking us, and to convene debate about how it can best help realize human potential

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The U.S. government claimed that turning American medical charts into electronic records would make health care better, safer, and cheaper. Ten years and $36 billion later, the system is an unholy mess. Inside a digital revolution gone wrong

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Sim Ethics

September 6, 2018

Say you could make a thousand digital replicas of yourself – should you? What happens when you want to get rid of them?

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DNA Has Gone Digital

December 8, 2017

What could possibly go wrong? Biology is becoming increasingly digitized. Researchers like us use computers to analyze DNA, operate lab equipment and store genetic information. But new capabilities also mean new risks – and biologists remain largely unaware of the potential vulnerabilities that come with digitizing biotechnology

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For the first time, the Food and Drug Administration has approved a digital pill — a medication embedded with a sensor that can tell doctors whether, and when, patients take their medicine

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When Bakul Patel started as a policy advisor in the US Food and Drug Administration in 2008, he could pretty much pinpoint when a product was going to land in front of the reviewers in his division. Back when medical devices were heavy on the hardware—your pacemakers and your IUDs—it would take manufacturers years to get them ready for regulatory approval. FDA reviewers could keep up pretty well

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But their prices are widening the health gap. Touted benefits can be realized only if those with chronic conditions have access to the technologies aimed at helping them. There is a gap between those who would receive the greatest benefit from using digital health technologies and those who actually have access to them

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A professor of neuroscience says it will one day be possible to live on in a computer after death

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