A panel of government-appointed experts in Germany agreed unanimously that the human germline “is not inviolable,” rejecting one objection to using genome editing technologies such as CRISPR to make heritable changes in the DNA of human embryos, sperm, or eggs

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“2019 is the year when the training wheels come off and the world gets to see what CRISPR can really do for the world in the most positive sense,” says Fyodor Urnov, a gene-editing scientist at the Altius Institute for Biomedical Sciences in Seattle and the University of California, Berkeley

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“It’s easy to get on your high horse when you’re not in our position,” she said. “If editing an IVF embryo is the best option to mitigate the pain that a child would otherwise suffer, then give us the choice.”

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Watch now: The NAM & CSIS Commission on Strengthening America’s Health Security hosted a conversation on whether human germline genome editing should be permitted, the types of applications which might be appropriate, the standards and criteria that should be followed, and what regulatory or governance framework is needed. Panel includes our Jeffrey Kahn

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The 18-member committee “will examine the scientific, ethical, social and legal challenges associated with human genome editing,” according to the WHO announcement

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Experts, including our Jeffrey Kahn, weigh in on gene-editing technology

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In last year’s action film “Rampage,” which featured Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, CRISPR gene-editing technology turns a gorilla, a wolf, and a crocodile into monsters the size of skyscrapers that destroy Chicago.

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The research, to be published in the March issue of the journal Quaternary Science Reviews, represents an ambitious attempt to show that, through a series of events, human activity was affecting the climate long before the industrial revolution and global warming

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