Clinical trials in the United States have been plagued for years by two well-known problems: They don’t recruit enough people and they fail to reflect the diversity of our nation. The good news is that solving the diversity problem can resolve both issues. Two birds, one stone

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But they’re learning hard lessons along the way. The numbers are encouraging, but only a start, educators say

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Just 50 years ago, some 1,000 small and family-owned seed companies were producing and distributing seeds in the United States; by 2009, there were fewer than 100. Thanks to a series of mergers and acquisitions over the last few years, four multinational agrochemical firms now control over 60 percent of global seed sales

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Texas Tech recently announced it will no longer take race into account in admissions to its medical school—a move that might affect not only aspiring doctors, but many of their would-be patients as well

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Researchers from under-represented groups are making genomics more inclusive by working with communities that have been overlooked or abused

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The studies that link genetic markers with disease focus largely on white European populations, and neglect other races and ethnicities, according to an analysis published in the journal Cell on Thursday.

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A quiet but revolutionary new nat’l health policy goes into effect this week, ushering in changes that could lead to important medical discoveries that benefit most Americans. One problem. Implementing the change will require that our country’s health researchers make some fundamental changes in how they do business

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If we want a diverse, equitable and inclusive research community, academics from the global south must be able to meet freely, says Connie Nshemereirwe

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