As Germans consider end-of-life legislation, so-called “death with dignity” laws are set to expand in the United States. Miriam Widman reports from Portland, Oregon, one of the first places to allow the right to die

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We have devices that track our daily exercise and the quality of our sleep. Test results are sent from lab in hours, and doctors can see patients over video. And yet, a patient sometimes can’t easily have her medical file sent from one doctor to another, even in the same building, and sometimes medical record software is so difficult to work with that a doctor can only search one page at a time

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Some doctors blame patient pressure because they are concerned their children will be exposed to dangerous diseases

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A study published Tuesday by researchers at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health shows that 59 percent of adults used a prescription drug in a 30-day period. That’s up from just 50 percent when the survey was last conducted a decade earlier

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Priyanka Pulla asks if there can ever be legitimacy in ‘quackery’

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The new rule did not ignite the fierce fight that a similar measure did during the health law debate. Medicare officials also turned down requests from hospitals to change their plans for a controversial rule to determine which patients are considered out-patient status, and the Wall Street Journal examines how the federal government is curbing the auditors who check those hospital decisions

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It’s rare to bring homicide charges against a physician

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(Video) Prof. Tom Beauchamp, PhD, of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University, discusses the legislative history and ethics of the right to die and physician assistance in the United States

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