“You’re at the hospital because something’s wrong with you – you’re vulnerable – then you get to wear the most vulnerable garment ever invented to make the whole experience that much worse,” said Ted Streuli, who lives in Edmond, Okla., and has had to wear hospital gowns on multiple occasions

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How We Die

March 30, 2015

Recent stories on death and dying offer interesting perspectives on discussing, preparing for and coping with an inevitable part of all of our lives

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Maureen Carrigg, who lives in Wayne, Neb., was diagnosed with multiple myeloma six years ago. Even though she says she was meticulous about staying within her insurer’s network for care, she still ended up owing $80,000 in out-of-pocket costs

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Precision medicine implies that “if you know somebody’s genes, you’ll be able to fit the treatment to them, which is reductionist,” said Zackary Berger, MD, PhD, faculty member of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. Still, Berger noted in an interview, “it’s hard to be against more money for research. You don’t want to poison your own well.”

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I. Glenn Cohen: The relationship between medicine and capital punishment has been a persistent feature of this past year in health law, both at the level of medical ethics and Supreme Court review

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The Supreme Court has given pro-life advocates free rein, even if it distresses patients. But getting people to listen is more complicated

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Over the objections of the medical community, state Rep. Stuart Spitzer, R-Kaufman, has filed a bill that would prohibit doctors from asking patients whether they own a firearm and makes the Texas Medical Board, which licenses physicians, responsible for doling out punishment

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A report found that just 45 percent of Medicare patients who’d been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s said they were informed of the diagnosis by their doctor. By contrast, more than 90 percent of Medicare patients with cancer said they were told by their doctor

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