The Food and Drug Administration defines a drug shortage as a “period of time when the demand or projected demand for a medically necessary drug in the U.S. exceeds its supply.” All too often, a shortage means that doctors cannot give the right drugs to patients when needed

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There is a general shortage of information about the safety of medications used during pregnancy—largely because any woman who is pregnant, was recently pregnant, or might get pregnant is barred from participating in most of the clinical trials that evaluate drug safety and efficacy

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What is poop? Is it a drug? Is it a bodily tissue? Is it a little of both? Then, is the transplant itself a procedure? That’s a whole other regulatory category

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Our Jeremy Greene, a professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine said that this was an important first step, but pointed out that shame, alone, may not be a powerful enough incentive to change behavior

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Sajni Chakrabarti’s parents were staggered when doctors at Boston Children’s Hospital told them that the 7-year-old girl’s puzzling symptoms — several falls, trouble moving her pinky finger while playing the violin — were caused by a rare and malignant brain tumor

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Research on the pharmaceutical industry has revealed that one reason for malaria’s continued virulence in the developing world is ineffective medicine. In fact, in some poor African countries, many malaria drugs are actually expired, substandard or fake

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The results highlight the potential for company payments to influence doctors’ treatment decisions, said Dr. Yoram Unguru of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics in Baltimore, who wasn’t involved in the study. “Patients trust that their physicians will make objective and evidence-based decisions on their behalf, which reflect their interests and that these decisions will also limit harms,”

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Victoria Toline would hunch over the kitchen table, steady her hands and draw a bead of liquid from a vial with a small dropper. It was a delicate operation that had become a daily routine — extracting ever tinier doses of the antidepressant she had taken for three years, on and off, and was desperately trying to quit

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