DNA tests can have a placebo effect

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The scene is shadowy, and the background music foreboding. On the TV screen, a stream of beleaguered humans stand in an unending line. “If you’re waiting patiently for a liver transplant, it could cost you your life,” warns the narrator. One man pulls another out of the queue, signaling an escape. Both smile

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Finding out my father lied about his heritage has forced me to radically question who I am

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Will your doctor be happy to see you? People can get a growing number of health-related genetic test results outside the clinical setting. Some direct to consumer (DTC) companies like 23andMe provide a limited number of such results directly to the individual

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Julia Brody writes, “My lab has been doing that for years.”

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And yes, that last name is familiar. Barbara Rae-Venter is pioneering a new, high-stakes application of genomics — one that could put killers behind bars. Half a lifetime ago, she was married to the man who went on to become perhaps the best-known pioneer of the field

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“I thought it would be good to get tested,” says Steyn. “I thought this is something I should know.” She ordered a $200 testing kit from the company, 23andme, spit into a small plastic tube, sent it back and waited for the results

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A reporter’s effort to erase her genetic footprint gets snared in a thicket of policies and rules

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