Philip Ball writes, “There are now several companies offering to read your genes: 23andMe, Ancestry DNA, and Family Tree DNA are a few of the most prominent. You send them a saliva swab and cross their palm with silver, and back comes an analysis of your DNA.There are plenty of grounds for skepticism about the new business of personal genomics.”

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Hockey and DNA

November 9, 2017

Personalized genetic tests show up rink-side. Alex Hogan writes, “At an NHL hockey game, it’s not uncommon to see some blood. The other day, it turned out to be some of my own.”

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How Anne Wojcicki led her company from the brink of failure to scientific pre-eminence

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Barbara Ellen: They promise to reveal everything from our ancestry to our chances of serious illness. But are DNA tests accurate and do they tell us anything worthwhile?

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Spending on such commercials grew 62 percent since 2012, even as ad spending for most other product types was flat. “Pharmaceutical advertising has grown more in the past four years than any other leading ad category,” said Jon Swallen, chief research officer at Kantar Media, a consulting firm that tracks multimedia advertising. It exceeded $6 billion last year, with television picking up the lion’s share

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The DNA Test as Horoscope

January 31, 2017

Stephane Budel has an idea for an app, and it goes like this. You get your DNA sequenced to find out which comic book superhero you are. Now bear with us for a minute: The test, Budel explains, could look at the similarity between genes found in both humans and spiders to give you a Spiderman score

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Euny Hong: I did a 23andMe genetic test because I suspected I might be partially descended from Middle-Eastern medieval merchants, who were Korea’s first Occidental trading partners. (My feeble basis for this theory included my hair texture and a possible epigenetic explanation for my Jewish conversion.) But the data took me in some strange directions. As did the horrifying lack of data

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