The new tools will likely open the doors for scientists to explore many novel areas. With comments from our Alan Regenberg

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Watch now: The NAM & CSIS Commission on Strengthening America’s Health Security hosted a conversation on whether human germline genome editing should be permitted, the types of applications which might be appropriate, the standards and criteria that should be followed, and what regulatory or governance framework is needed. Panel includes our Jeffrey Kahn

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Chemist Floyd Romesberg, who has created his own unnatural base pairs, biologist Jef Boeke, who is working to create a synthetic yeast genome, and bioethicist Debra Mathews talk about how altered genomes could be used for creating novel medicines and fuels—and whether this is considered a new form of life

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Less than two years after producing an exhaustive report on human genome editing, the NASEM are planning an international commission on the most controversial use of that technology — creating “CRISPR babies,” medicine academy president Dr. Victor Dzau announced on Thursday at the World Economic Forum in Davos

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New report from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics on the social and ethical issues

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If we decide to use it. The debate over whether to use genetically modified mosquitoes to fight malaria, explained

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Authors, including our Jeremy Sugarman, offer a call to action, ‘Companies that develop and distribute tools for genome editing have a responsibility to construct and implement policies and procedures to protect the integrity of science, to educate their employees to make certain that all research conducted within the company adheres to the highest ethical standards’

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DNA is the code of life, and so advances that allow us to edit that code have unlocked vast potential, from simply editing away the buggy code of disease, to engineering animals that don’t spread illness, to, maybe one day in a distant future, creating so-called designer babies. But editing another essential molecular component of our biology—RNA, the cells to turns DNA instructions into proteins—also holds great promise

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