Revising the Genome

December 4, 2017

CRISPR lets scientists edit our genetic source code. This is going to be interesting. With comments from our Debra Mathews

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Progress in the use of CRISPR–Cas9 for human germline editing highlights some pressing ethical considerations for research on embryos

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More than 116,000 Americans are waiting to receive an organ transplant, and about 20 die each day during the wait. Scientists are eager to find solutions to the organ shortage

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We’ve heard already from a few parents whose children have, or may carry, genetic disorders. This reader’s son suffers from Tourette syndrome, ADHD, and OCD, all severe

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The gene editing tool CRISPR could one day mean that we can simply edit away disease, blight and undesirable genetic traits. Now, it’s also gaining traction in another realm of medical technology: diagnosing disease

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The National Academies of Science and Medicine (NASEM) released a report on Feb. 14 exploring the implications of new technologies that can alter the genome of living organisms, including humans

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Expert group recommends long-term tracking, other restrictions for germline tinkering. Jeffrey Kahn, a bioethicist at Johns Hopkins University, says the door to heritable gene therapy remains closed until stringent requirements can be met. “It’s frankly more of a knock on the door,” he said at the public presentation of the report

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Human Genome Editing

February 15, 2017

Science, Ethics, and Governance. The National Academies has published a consensus study by a multidisciplinary team of experts, including our Jeffrey Kahn,

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