This briefing note from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics examines the ethical issues that can arise when patients and doctors wish to use experimental treatments

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The manufacture and distribution of medicines is a global industry, tainted by fake and substandard products. Not only might these drugs not work as expected, but some are even contributing to antimicrobial resistance. So, what’s in your medicine cabinet?

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Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Bioethics Institute at Johns Hopkins University, said the move is consistent with recommendations from the Institute of Medicine several years ago. “We have mechanisms in place to protect patients,” he said. “It doesn’t need to be treated as a special case of clinical research any longer.”

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An expensive screening program designed to keep the Zika virus out of the Red Cross’ blood supply has caught fewer than a dozen infected donations, a new study published Wednesday revealed. Study authors include our Jeremy Sugarman

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More than half of Americans take vitamin supplements, including 68 percent of those age 65 and older, according to a 2013 Gallup poll. Among older adults, 29 percent take four or more supplements of any kind, according to a Journal of Nutrition study published in 2017

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The Last Resort

March 27, 2018

Private clinics in Germany sell cancer patients hope — and mixed results — at exorbitant prices. Some, like the Hallwang Clinic, cater primarily to foreigners

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At first glance, a bill passed by the House of Representatives this week seems like the kind of thing anyone could get behind. It would allow terminally ill patients access to experimental drugs without the approval of the FDA. But the bill and a similar one passed last summer by the Senate do little to address the main barrier that patients face in getting unapproved treatments: permission from the drug companies themselves

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Opponents say the bill undermines the Food and Drug Administration’s existing compassionate use program while giving false hope to dying patients

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