A key Republican lawmaker released a new version of so-called “right to try” legislation around midnight Friday, a pivotal next step in the effort to help dying patients get access to experimental therapies

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Five years ago, the phrase “right to try” wasn’t yet an inkling in the minds of its staunchest advocates. Today, the pithy shorthand for the campaign to get dying patients access to experimental treatments has been slapped on bumper stickers, emblazoned on T-shirts, and uttered by some of the most powerful figures in Washington

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Dozens of doctors, medical ethicists, and lawyers are warning Congress that legislation to allow Americans with life-threatening conditions access to unapproved, experimental drugs risks harming patients’ health

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It’s a disaster in the making…it’s actually an approach that could do more harm than good for people who seemingly have “nothing left to lose.” I’m also not sure why such a law is needed, since people like me already have access to experimental therapies

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Clinical trial will compare three antiretroviral drug regimens. It will provide data on the use of these newer drugs during pregnancy, helping to ensure that women living with HIV and their infants receive the best available treatments

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Christopher Robertson and Kelly McBride Folkers write, “Despite the policy’s broad support, it has yet to help a single patient in Arizona obtain an experimental drug that they couldn’t have gotten before. Thirty-seven other states have also passed right to try bills, but likewise have seen little real impact for patients.”

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The human immune system can hinder the gene-editing tool, though there could be ways around it

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On Monday, the Food and Drug Administration announced plans to crack down on so-called “homeopathic remedies”—treatments that due to agency enforcement policy have managed to avoid regulatory oversight

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