The U.S. government claimed that turning American medical charts into electronic records would make health care better, safer, and cheaper. Ten years and $36 billion later, the system is an unholy mess. Inside a digital revolution gone wrong

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Voice-recognition system promises to automate data entry during office visits. While alluring to doctors, the technology poses thorny questions, including whether patients will be comfortable inviting a third-party company with a camera and microphone into a conversation with their doctor

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When entities such as health plans and health care providers handle personal health information, they are often subject to data privacy regulation. But amid a flood of new forms of health data, some third parties have figured out ways to avoid some data privacy laws, developing what we call “shadow health records”

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Tech giants like Amazon and Apple are expanding their businesses to include electronic health records — which contain data on diagnoses, prescriptions and other medical information. That’s creating both opportunities and spurring privacy concerns. Here’s what to know (Video)

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With plenty of potential healthcare concerns and complications arising out of medical diagnoses and treatments themselves, errors in medical records present an unfortunate additional opportunity for improper treatment

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As more and more hospitals have adopted electronic medical records, their records have become linked and you can follow your patients, virtually, hundreds of miles away

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Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient. But are screens coming between doctors and patients? By Atul Gawande

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The American Medical Association is opposing a change to patient privacy laws that would allow doctors to more freely share information about a patient’s history of substance use, a proposal that has divided the health care community and highlighted some of the challenges of addressing the opioid epidemic

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