Americans may soon be able to get their medical records through smartphone apps as easily as they order takeout food from Seamless or catch a ride from Lyft. But prominent medical organizations are warning that patient data-sharing with apps could facilitate invasions of privacy — and they are fighting the change

Quick Read

Harlan Krumholz writes, “At a time when many insurers and health information technology companies are busily assembling databases of hundreds of millions of medical records, Americans find it difficult to get access to their own”

Quick Read

As Wei Wei Lee sat with her doctor to discuss starting a family, she felt a “distance” between them. The physician was busy on the computer and focused on the screen

Quick Read

The U.S. government claimed that turning American medical charts into electronic records would make health care better, safer, and cheaper. Ten years and $36 billion later, the system is an unholy mess. Inside a digital revolution gone wrong

Quick Read

Voice-recognition system promises to automate data entry during office visits. While alluring to doctors, the technology poses thorny questions, including whether patients will be comfortable inviting a third-party company with a camera and microphone into a conversation with their doctor

Quick Read

When entities such as health plans and health care providers handle personal health information, they are often subject to data privacy regulation. But amid a flood of new forms of health data, some third parties have figured out ways to avoid some data privacy laws, developing what we call “shadow health records”

Quick Read

Tech giants like Amazon and Apple are expanding their businesses to include electronic health records — which contain data on diagnoses, prescriptions and other medical information. That’s creating both opportunities and spurring privacy concerns. Here’s what to know (Video)

Quick Read

With plenty of potential healthcare concerns and complications arising out of medical diagnoses and treatments themselves, errors in medical records present an unfortunate additional opportunity for improper treatment

Quick Read