Between 1999 and 2001, I helped eight people die, including the poet Al Purdy. Now, as I prepare to take my own life, I’m ready to tell my story

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In October, California became the fifth state to allow terminally ill patients to end their lives with prescriptions from their doctors after months of contentious debate. Religious groups and disability rights activists fought against the law and tried unsuccessfully to get a referendum on the ballot to overturn it. Late last week the bill’s authors announced that the aid-in-dying law would take effect June 9

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I’m a Doctor

February 25, 2016

Preparing you for death is as much a part of my job as saving lives.

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How Much Time Have I Got, Doc?

February 24, 2016

Predicting how long a patient will survive is critically important for them and their families to guide future planning, yet notoriously difficult for doctors to predict accurately. While many patients request this information, others do not wish to know, or are incapable of knowing due to disease progression

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“Family members of critically or terminally ill patients sometimes seek reassurance from the physician that their loved ones are receiving the same care their physicians would receive,” said lead author Joel Weissman, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston

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When you are very sick or hurt, you know to go to the emergency room. Chances are good that our complex, aggressive medical interventions will make you better. But those odds change dramatically once you have an end-stage chronic medical condition or terminal illness. In that case, you are gambling, and the odds are heavily against you

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by: Elizabeth Dzeng, As ethicists like to point out, what is the law is not always ethical and what is ethical is not always the law. Passage of the End of Life Options Act in California does not imply that we’ve resolved the debate on aid in dying, nor should it define our moral stance

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As Germans consider end-of-life legislation, so-called “death with dignity” laws are set to expand in the United States. Miriam Widman reports from Portland, Oregon, one of the first places to allow the right to die

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