Trying to gain an advantage over your opponent is as old as sport itself. But what’s considered fair and unfair is often up for debate

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It’s reasonable to believe that any seismic shift toward genetic enhancement will not be centered in Western countries like the U.S. or the U.K., where many modern technologies are pioneered. Instead, genetic enhancement is more likely to emerge out of China

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Huge survey tests people’s attitudes towards potential future biomedical technologies

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You want to be a cyborg, but medical ethicists aren’t sure it should be your call. Our Margaret Moon speaks with Inverse about requests for enhancements

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June 28, 2016

Three years ago, Neil Harbisson, who is completely color-blind, had an antenna implanted in his skull that enables the artist and entrepreneur to sense color via audio vibrations. The long, metallic device, dubbed the ‘eyeborg,’ curves over the top of his head and hovers just above his eye line. It effectively made Harbisson into one of the world’s first cyborgs

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A growing student population has been using them as “study” drugs – that help them stay up all night and concentrate. According to a 2007 National Institutes of Health (NIH) study, abuse of nonmedical prescription drugs among college students, such as ADHD meds, increased from 8.3 percent in 1996 to 14.6 percent in 2006

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Mosaic’s Frieda Klotz visited the ‘world’s first cyborg fair’ with one question: are cyborgs a real thing, or are these people just kidding themselves?

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Bioethics Seminar (Video): Oxford philosophy and bioethics professor Julian Savulescu discusses terrorism, global poverty and climate change as issues that could potentially benefit from human moral enhancement.

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