WHO today launched a global initiative to reduce severe, avoidable medication-associated harm in all countries by 50% over the next 5 years

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The years spent as a grad student and postdoc are among the most trying times for any scientist. The pressure to publish is intense, as young researchers vie for the few jobs at the heads of academic labs. Those high stakes and the pressure-cooker atmosphere make mistakes — and sometimes the willingness to cut corners and commit fraud — more likely

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Enthusiasm for precision medicine, from the White House down to everyday physicians, is at an all-time high. But serious problems with the databases used to interpret patients’ genetic profiles can lead to “inappropriate treatment” with “devastating consequences,” researchers at the Mayo Clinic warned on Monday

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We’re not doing enough to prevent mistakes that lead to unnecessary deaths

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The mouse slips, and the emergency room doctor clicks on the wrong number, ordering a medication dosage that’s far too large. Elsewhere, in another ER’s electronic health record, a patient’s name isn’t clearly displayed, so the nurse misses it and enters symptoms in the wrong person’s file

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Each year, in the United States, millions of patients are harmed while receiving care in hospitals. They get infections, experience adverse reactions to drugs, develop dangerous bed sores, or come down with pneumonia from the very ventilators meant to help them breathe

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In the US, patients harmed during medical care have few avenues for redress. The Danes chose to forget about fault and focus on what’s fair

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When Charles Thompson checked into the hospital one July morning in 2011, he expected a standard colonoscopy. He never anticipated how wrong things would go.

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