Researchers have launched an innovative medical experiment that’s designed to provide quick answers while meeting the needs of patients, rather than drug companies

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Police want a sample. They can do it the easy way, or they can do it the hard way

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If you’re a pregnant woman and have a backache or headache, or a fever, your options for over-the-counter treatment basically boil down to one medication: the pain reliever acetaminophen, better known as Tylenol…But evidence has accumulated that, when taken during pregnancy, acetaminophen may increase the risk that children will develop asthma or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

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A regulatory loophole allows businesses to offer potentially ineffective or harmful treatments, a researcher warns

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Piggybacking on contentious research, the startup Ambrosia is offering blood transfusions meant to rejuvenate people

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Before a drug can be marketed, it has to go through rigorous testing to show it is safe and effective. Surgery, though, is different. The Food and Drug Administration does not regulate surgical procedures. So what happens when an operation is subjected to and fails the ultimate test — a clinical trial in which patients are randomly assigned to have it or not?

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When a certified nursing assistant in Hubbard, Iowa, shared a photo online in March of a nursing home resident with his pants around his ankles, his legs and hand covered in feces, the most surprising aspect of state health officials’ investigation was this: It wasn’t against the law

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The US Preventive Services Task Force, which advises the federal government on preventive care, concluded that there is not enough evidence to recommend the procedure for healthy women. Studies have not shown that pelvic exams decrease a woman’s chance of developing illnesses such as ovarian cancer or of dying prematurely, the task force said

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