One of the namesakes of the federal “right-to-try” law confirmed Tuesday that he gained access to an experimental treatment thanks to the new law

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“It’s confusing. It’s confusing for even people like me who do this day in and day out,” Alison Bateman-House, a bioethicist at New York University who opposed the federal right-to-try law on the grounds that it would give patients false hope and could potentially lead to patient harm

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Drugs that activate the immune system to fight cancer have brought remarkable recoveries to many people in recent years. But one of those drugs seems to have had the opposite effect on three patients with an uncommon blood cancer who were taking part in a study

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A campaign to vaccinate people at risk of developing Ebola in the latest outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo could begin by the end of this week, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the director-general of the World Health Organization, said Sunday

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Christopher Robertson and Kelly McBride Folkers write, “Despite the policy’s broad support, it has yet to help a single patient in Arizona obtain an experimental drug that they couldn’t have gotten before. Thirty-seven other states have also passed right to try bills, but likewise have seen little real impact for patients.”

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Citing uncertainties about the risks and benefits of an experimental therapy for fetuses whose kidneys do not develop, bioethicists at Johns Hopkins, including our Jeremy Sugarman, and a team of medical experts are calling for rigorous clinical trials in the use of a potential treatment, known as amnioinfusion

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Grant Armstrong said Charlie’s parents had made the decision because an American doctor said it was too late to give him nucleoside therapy

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There can’t be many people in the UK who haven’t heard of Charlie Gard. He’s a little boy with mitochondrial disease who is on life support. His parents want to send him to the US for experimental treatment; the UK courts have ruled on medical advice that the treatment does not show sufficient promise. Medics think Charlie can’t be helped. His desperate parents claim otherwise, citing the support of 7 international doctors and a 350,000 strong petition

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