After premature births, parents can suffer from PTSD. Peer networks are forming to help

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Kellogg and his wife, Luella, had adopted Gua from Cuba at 7-and-a-half months to see if a chimp would act like a human if raised with their 10-month-old son and surrounded by other people — a bizarre thesis in any era but especially in 1931. Today, the experiment would never pass an ethics board. “Experimenting on your own children is highly problematic,” says Jeffrey Kahn of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics

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David Kroll writes, “In 1984, when I was a junior in college and my sister a junior in high school, my then-44-year-old mother was diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer. I would have done anything for her then, and continued to do so until she died on Dec. 9, 2017, in her bed at her home in Santa Fe, New Mexico, some 33 years after her initial diagnosis.”

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World’s largest family tree shines light on life span, who marries whom

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Lynn Black’s mother-in-law, who had lupus and lung cancer, was rushed into a hospital intensive care unit last summer with shortness of breath. As she lay in bed, intubated and unresponsive, a parade of doctors told the family “all good news.”

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An Italian woman, her two daughters, and her three grandchildren have always had trouble feeling pain. They can’t sense temperature. They break bones without noticing. Now, a team of scientists in the United Kingdom think they’ve figured out why

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A new Johns Hopkins support team helps clinicians and families understand a difficult diagnosis. The topic was the focus of a September Ethics for Lunch discussion in the Chevy Chase Bank Auditorium of The Johns Hopkins Hospital, hosted by the Berman Institute of Bioethics

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Have the conversation.

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