The Nobel-winning biologist has drawn global criticism with unfounded pronouncements on genetics, race and intelligence. He still thinks he’s right, a new documentary finds

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Johns Hopkins experts, including our Jeffrey Kahn, discuss the issues raised by Mary Shelley’s groundbreaking novel. Media+Monsters: Two Centuries of Frankenstein takes place Wednesday, Oct 31, at the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Parkway theater

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“Recently I did something that many people would consider unthinkable, or at least perverse. Before going to see “Avengers: Infinity War,” I deliberately read a review that revealed all of the major plot points, from start to finish.” Vera Tobin writes, “As a cognitive scientist who studies the relationship between cognition and narratives, I know that movies – like all stories – exploit our natural tendency to anticipate what’s coming next”

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Does ‘Rampage’ get the science of CRISPR right?

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Can corporations become so powerful that they dictate the way we feel? Can machines get mad – like, really mad – at their makers? Can people learn to love machines? These are a few of the questions raised by Ridley Scott’s influential sci-fi neo-noir film “Blade Runner” (1982), which imagines a corporation whose product tests the limits of the machine-man divide

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Ananyo Bhattacharya looks back at a science-fiction touchstone on the ethics of experimental biology. By the time science-fiction writer Daniel Keyes died in 2014 at the age of 86, he had lived through vast upheavals in biomedical science, from the discovery of the DNA double helix to the sequencing of the human genome

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When the Tribeca Film Festival canceled its controversial screening of Vaxxed, a “documentary” (with scare-quotes) alleging a Centers for Disease Control cover-up of the debunked vaccine-autism link, it vindicated what scientists have collectively been saying for years: There’s nothing to talk about here. Vaccines don’t cause autism, and there’s no CDC cover-up, full stop

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