One of the projects has already received funding from the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) in Bethesda, Maryland, and will start in a few weeks; the other is awaiting funding

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Need another reason to get the flu shot if you’re pregnant? A study out this week shows that pregnant women with the flu who are hospitalized in an intensive care unit are four times more likely to deliver babies prematurely and four and a half times more likely to have a baby of low birth weight

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And we are not prepared for it. A century ago, the Spanish flu killed more than 50 million people. The world is at risk of another pandemic of similar scale

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Among the dead were 180 babies, children and teenagers, more than in any year since the C.D.C. began tracking pediatric deaths

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One hundred years ago, a novel pandemic influenza virus spread rapidly around the world. It killed about 1 to 2 percent of the human population, primarily young and often healthy adults. The centennial of the 1918 pandemic is a good time to take stock of how far the world has come since this historic health disaster – and to face the sobering fact that several key mysteries have yet to be resolved

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How well are doctors, nurses and other workers at your local hospital vaccinated against the flu? That depends on the hospital. According to data from the California Department of Public Health, flu vaccination rates among health care staffers at the state’s acute care hospitals range from a low of 37 percent to 100 percent

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But many of us still get the basic facts wrong. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the great influenza pandemic of 1918. Between 50 and 100 million people are thought to have died, representing as much as 5 percent of the world’s population. Half a billion people were infected

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Vaccination is underway for the 2017-2018 seasonal flu, and next year will mark the 100-year anniversary of the 1918 flu pandemic, which killed roughly 40 million people

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