If you take genes from another kind of plant, or bacteria, and insert them into a crop like soybeans, the result is considered a GMO. You need government approval to sell a new GMO. If you just take a snippet out of a gene without inserting anything new, though, the product falls into a gray area

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High-tech meat alternatives are grabbing a lot of headlines these days. Meanwhile, Lou Cooperhouse was in a San Diego office park quietly forging plans to disrupt another more fragmented and opaque sector of the food industry: seafood

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In some places, like rural sub-Saharan Africa, and rural South Asia, people don’t get enough animal products to get their growth cognitive needs,” said Jessica Fanzo, an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics

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How two cities are tackling obesity. New York and Chicago agree: Obesity is a problem. They have really different plans to fix it

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Even if tomato growers one day manage to produce a near-perfect fruit—one that’s beautiful, juicy, nutritious, and tasty—there’s a good chance that half a billion people would automatically be denied the chance to even try it

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Matt Arteaga, 51, is one of about 500 people who got sick this summer in an outbreak linked to McDonald’s salads. The cause was a parasite, cyclospora

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Our Jessica Fanzo writes, “Governments should help people choose nutritious groceries.”

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Without any public scrutiny, insurers and data brokers are predicting your health costs based on data about things like race, marital status, how much TV you watch, whether you pay your bills on time or even buy plus-size clothing

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