A powerful and controversial new genetic engineering technology called a gene drive offers the potential to drastically reshape our world by overriding natural selection. And the US military’s research arm is among one of the technology’s biggest research funders

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For more than half a century, scientists have dreamed of harnessing an odd quirk of nature— “selfish genes,” which bypass the normal 50/50 laws of inheritance and force their way into offspring—to engineer entire species. But after all the hype, and fear of the technology’s misuse, scientists are now questioning whether gene drives will work at all

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A gene drive bid aims to eliminate malaria

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Tom welcomes Dr. Jeffrey Kahn to Studio A. Dr. Kahn is the director of the Berman Center of Bioethics at Johns Hopkins University. Folks in his field think about things like the ethical ramifications of research, how doctors interact with patients, public health policy, and global approaches to things like food distribution and allocation of medicine

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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine on Wednesday endorsed research on a technology known as “gene drive,” which gives humans the power for the first time to alter or eliminate entire populations of organisms in the wild — like mosquitoes, mice or plants — through deliberate genetic manipulation

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The Extinction Invention

April 13, 2016

A genetic technology that can kill off mosquito species could eradicate malaria. But is it too risky to ever use?

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In a startling development in ‘gene-drive’ technology, a team of researchers at the University of California have succeeded in creating hundreds of genetically modified mosquitoes that are incapable of spreading the malaria parasite to humans, and which could potentially spread this trait rapidly throughout mosquito populations in the wild

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