An international commission, including our Jeffrey Kahn, has been convened by the NAM, NAS, and the Royal Society with the participation of science & medical academies around the world, to develop a framework for scientists, clinicians, and regulatory authorities to consider when assessing potential clinical applications of human germline genome editing

Quick Read

The draft rules mean that anyone who manipulates human genes in adults or embryos is responsible for adverse outcomes

Quick Read

Our Jeffrey Kahn joins panelists at a symposium cohosted by the Berman Institute and the New York Stem Cell Foundation with support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation. Watch now:

Quick Read

A panel of government-appointed experts in Germany agreed unanimously that the human germline “is not inviolable,” rejecting one objection to using genome editing technologies such as CRISPR to make heritable changes in the DNA of human embryos, sperm, or eggs

Quick Read

If you take genes from another kind of plant, or bacteria, and insert them into a crop like soybeans, the result is considered a GMO. You need government approval to sell a new GMO. If you just take a snippet out of a gene without inserting anything new, though, the product falls into a gray area

Quick Read

The concern is largely ethical. The reality is that biologists probably couldn’t produce designer babies even if they wanted to

Quick Read

If all goes as planned, the first clinical trial in the United States testing CRISPR against cancer by altering the DNA of tumor cells inside patients could begin recruiting participants next year, the scientist leading the effort told STAT

Quick Read

Join NYSCF and the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics on May 8, 6-8pm for an interactive discussion featuring Betsy Myers, PhD, Neville Sanjana, PhD, Susan L. Solomon, JD as well as Johns Hopkins bioethicist Jeffrey Kahn, PhD, MPH to explore the implications of gene editing for research, medicine, and humanity.

Quick Read