But only because we can’t. Gene experts speculate that our worst gene-editing fears won’t come true because they are too complex for us to pull them off

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Despite the appearance of agreement, scientists are not of the same mind about the ethics and governance of human germline editing. A careful review of public comments and published commentaries in top-tier science journals reveals marked differences in perspective

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Under the direction of Rebecca Wilbanks, a postdoctoral fellow in the Berman Institute and the Dept of the History of Medicine, students have been immersing themselves in bioethics and applying what they learn to their understanding of technology, with an emphasis on robotics and reproductive technology in particular

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On the day after Thanksgiving 2018, Jennifer Doudna, whose research on bacterial immune systems led to the gene-editing technique known as CRISPR, received a startling email from the Chinese scientist He Jiankui. “Babies born,” read the subject line. (with comments from our Jeffrey Kahn)

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The Chinese scientist who shocked the world by announcing that twin girls had been born from embryos that he had created using genome editing has told two colleagues that, contrary to a flurry of reports that he is under house arrest and possibly even facing the death penalty, he is “actually doing quite well here.”

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A scientist in China claimed to have created the world’s first gene-edited human beings. How should the US respond? Listen now

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The unintended consequences of animal gene editing. Unintended effects have included enlarged rabbit tongues and extra pig vertebrae, as bioethicists warn of hubris

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The world urgently needs better international oversight of “genome editing in human embryos for reproductive purposes,” says an editorial co-written by the heads of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. National Academy of Medicine

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