The temptation to use these technologies to “enhance” ourselves or our children, or to edit out undesirable traits, will be enormous, writes Mildred Z Solomon

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The technology that produced a global scandal in China last year has entered into clinical trials to treat sickle cell anemia and an eye disease

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China now has at least four groups of CRISPR researchers doing gene editing with large colonies of monkeys

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A bipartisan trio of senators on Monday introduced a resolution underscoring their opposition to the experiments last year in China that led to the birth of the world’s first genome-edited babies

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Host Bethany Brookshire leads a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg.

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“We can’t stop progress with words on paper,” Denis Rebrikov said, when asked about international efforts to ban such research. Rebrikov spoke about his plans, addressing the scientific arguments against his CCR5 target and specifics about his ultimate aims and the prospect of his controversial experiment moving forward

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The proposal follows a Chinese scientist who claimed to have created twins from edited embryos last year. Molecular biologist Denis Rebrikov has told Nature he is considering implanting gene-edited embryos into women, possibly before the end of the year if he can get approval by then

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