Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Bioethics Institute at Johns Hopkins University, said the move is consistent with recommendations from the Institute of Medicine several years ago. “We have mechanisms in place to protect patients,” he said. “It doesn’t need to be treated as a special case of clinical research any longer.”

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Julian Savulescu presents hypothetical cases to explore whether safe and effective gene therapy ought to be compulsory

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But with plans to ease cost concerns. The first gene therapy in the U.S., approved last month to treat a rare, inherited form of blindness, now has a price tag: $850,000

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In type 1 diabetes, the body engages in warfare with itself, the immune system mistakenly treating the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas as a harmful invader, destroying the cells along with the body’s ability to regulate sugar. Typically diagnosed in youth, it has no cure, and patients face a lifetime of insulin injections and complications

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BioViva and its controversial CEO Liz Parrish want to bring experimental gene therapies to patients prior to approval by regulators in a quest to cure aging

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When the government says a new drug is approved for sale, the first thing many companies do is announce what it will cost. Not Spark Therapeutics, though

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Doctors took his stem cells, corrected a faulty mutation within them, and used them to replace 80 percent of his skin

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Who will pay for it? And how?

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