CRISPR’s reputation was tarnished last year after a researcher in China edited a gene in embryos that went on to develop into two baby girls. The current CRISPR trials don’t have the same ethical challenges — the therapies won’t lead to DNA changes that can be inherited, says Alan Regenberg, Still, he says, there’s reason for caution when working with humans

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Victoria Gray is waiting patiently in a hospital room at the Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville

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Host Bethany Brookshire leads a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg.

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As someone who has lived with spinal muscular atrophy for all 30 years of my life, I was perplexed and disappointed that the recent approval of Novartis’ gene therapy Zolgensma was immediately overshadowed by outrage over the drug’s price: $2.125 million

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Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Bioethics Institute at Johns Hopkins University, said the move is consistent with recommendations from the Institute of Medicine several years ago. “We have mechanisms in place to protect patients,” he said. “It doesn’t need to be treated as a special case of clinical research any longer.”

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Julian Savulescu presents hypothetical cases to explore whether safe and effective gene therapy ought to be compulsory

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But with plans to ease cost concerns. The first gene therapy in the U.S., approved last month to treat a rare, inherited form of blindness, now has a price tag: $850,000

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In type 1 diabetes, the body engages in warfare with itself, the immune system mistakenly treating the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas as a harmful invader, destroying the cells along with the body’s ability to regulate sugar. Typically diagnosed in youth, it has no cure, and patients face a lifetime of insulin injections and complications

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