One of the viruses used to treat her infections came from the side of a rotting South African eggplant

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Treaty’s vague language on how researchers can release engineered organisms has both opponents and supporters of the technology claiming victory

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Even if tomato growers one day manage to produce a near-perfect fruit—one that’s beautiful, juicy, nutritious, and tasty—there’s a good chance that half a billion people would automatically be denied the chance to even try it

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A visit to a facility in Guangdong province, where researchers are tinkering with monkey brains in order to understand the most severe forms of autism. With comments from our Jeffrey Kahn

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Recoding human cells to resist viruses. Its birth in 2016 was greeted with near hysteria over “secret meetings” and dire warnings about hubristic scientists creating made-from-scratch human genomes and designer babies. But two years in, an ambitious project to synthesize genomes — including human — is moving on from its shaky start and plunging in to the practical work of creating better genomes than nature

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In September, the U.S. Department of Agriculture gave the green light to a version of the plant Camelina sativa, an important oilseed crop that had been genetically engineered using CRISPR to produce enhanced omega-3 oil. What was interesting about this approval was that the USDA did not ask that the inventors of the plant endure the usual regulatory hoops required to sell biotech crops

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Bioethics in Action

January 12, 2018

This two-part series, uses resources in The New York Times to help students explore difficult ethical questions

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The human immune system can hinder the gene-editing tool, though there could be ways around it

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