Voluntary guidelines aim to combat ‘helicopter’ science and ensure that studies benefit African citizens and scientists

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Advances in gene editing are allowing researchers to create mouse models that more closely mirror the disease in humans

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The Code

April 10, 2018

The Code is a three-part video series investigating the roots of today’s most promising genetic technologies

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She writes, “While doctors and genetic counselors play an important role in delivering health care and health information, I am an advocate for consumers having more direct access to personalized information so they can take charge of their health”

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We have seen a rush for human remains before. More than a century ago, anthropologists were eager to assemble collections of skeletons. They were building a science of humanity and needed samples of skulls and bones to determine evolutionary history and define the characteristics of human races

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It’s become a familiar story in the age of consumer DNA testing: A person spits into a test tube to learn more about their genetic heritage, and ends up finding out they have a parent or sibling they didn’t know existed. It can be hard to keep family secrets under wraps when all it takes to reveal them is $99 and a mouthful of spit

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But it might not be smart to take one. Scientists have linked hundreds of genes to intelligence. One psychologist says it’s time to test school kids

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This spring, the National Institutes of Health will start recruiting participants for one of the most ambitious medical projects ever envisioned. The goal is to find one million people in the United States, from all walks of life and all racial and ethnic groups, who are willing to have their genomes sequenced, and to provide their medical records and regular blood samples

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