23andMe, the Google-backed personal genetics startup, will no longer just sell tests to consumers, or genetic data to pharmaceutical companies. This morning, it announced that it plans to start inventing medicines itself

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Parents’ traumatic experience may hamper their offspring’s ability to bounce back from trauma

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Reproduction 3.0

February 26, 2015

With a vote on Tuesday, the UK became the first nation to allow a mitochondrial donation technique to be licensed for use. Our faculty join the discussion on the ethics of creating a child with DNA from 3 “parents.”

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“I realized that we were very different, and we didn’t approach life in the same way,” Ms. Serrano said. “My biological daughter looked like me, but I suddenly realized that I had given birth to a person I didn’t know, and I was no longer the mother of that child.”

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The faces here, which look a bit like video game avatars, are actually portraits drawn from DNA. Each rendering was created by plugging an individual genetic profile into a predictive tool created by Mark D. Shriver, a professor of anthropology and genetics at Penn State University

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Experts, regulators mull how to foster technologies without posing undue risk to patients

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The U.K. might become the first nation to allow in-vitro fertilization using DNA from three people. Our Dr. Margaret Moon speaks with WSJ’s Tanya Rivero about the ethical implications

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All new fertility methods sound crazy at first. Yet it’s important to understand that mitochondrial replacement isn’t genetic engineering run amok, cautions Debra Mathews of the Berman Institute of Bioethics at Johns Hopkins University. “No one is messing directly with genes,” she says. “Scientists are replacing damaged mitochondria with healthy mitochondria.”

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